Last edited by Mojin
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Afro-Portuguese ivories found in the catalog.

Afro-Portuguese ivories

William Buller Fagg

Afro-Portuguese ivories

by William Buller Fagg

  • 6 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Batchworth Press in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ivories.,
  • Art, Black

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statement[text by W.P. [sic] Fagg ; photographs by W. and B. Forman].
    ContributionsForman, Werner., Forman, Bedřich.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsNK5987 F15
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxiii, [1] p., 46 p. of plates :
    Number of Pages46
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19334884M

    wrote book about Afro-Portuguese Ivories salt cellar bowl for salt (among other things) made of ivory (elephant tusks); depict men on large European ships, made for Europeans, also can depict African converts to Christianity (Bidyogo). William Fagg, in his book Afro-Portuguese Ivories, published in , expresses the common consent of scholars that these ivories were made to Portuguese order by African carvers. While their elaborate Renaissance style is in a character favored by fifteenth and sixteenth century European craftsmen, and while a number of the pieces display the.

    Dating and historicity --Commissioned art: Afro-Portuguese ivories --Attributions --Function and form of the works --Artefacts: works of art --A variety of formal solutions. Other Titles: Arte africana. Responsibility: Ezio Bassani. More information: TOC. Start studying Sapi-Portuguese "Lidded Saltcellar". Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. What caused the end of Sapi-Portuguese ivories? Afro-Portuguese ivories / art expert William Fagg in YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE.

    Brazilians form the largest immigrant community. Afro-Portuguese come from former African colonies- Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Sao Tome and Principe. Because citizenship is transferred from parent to child, jus sanguinis (right of blood), Afro-Portuguese are never citizens, instead are viewed as nationalities living in Portugal, even if living in the country . Among the most important relationships the Portuguese established was with the Edo people of the Kingdom of Benin in present-day Nigeria. In exchange for copper, brass, cloth, and cowrie shells, a form of currency in Benin, the Portuguese received spices, ivory, and, ultimately, slaves.


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Afro-Portuguese ivories by William Buller Fagg Download PDF EPUB FB2

The author gives a general description of the pieces, provides a not on each illustration, and relates the ivories Afro-Portuguese ivories book the whole corpus of African art.' Antiques & Collectibles, Ivory, Art, Afican Art, Portuguese Art, Afro-Portuguese Ivories, Carving.

Seller Inventory # s. More information about this seller | Contact this seller Essay. Ivories from the west coast of Africa were for the most part the first African artifacts brought back to Europe through trade.

The discovery of vast quantities of West African ivory, called “white gold” in Europe, transformed the nature of African-Portuguese trading in the fifteenth and sixteenth Portuguese wealth increased at this time, so did taste for these.

T he first trade goods from West Africa to be sold in Europe were the Afro-Portuguese ivories, exquisitely carved spoons, forks, saltcellars, pyxes and oliphants that are found today in museums in Europe and America. Photographs of these artifacts can be found in the book Africa and the Renaissance, Art in Ivory.

Bassani and Fagg, the authors of this book have divided the ivory. Genre/Form: Oversize books: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Fagg, William Buller.

Afro-Portuguese ivories. London, Batchworth Press []. The British Museum collection of ivories produced by Africa craftsmen to Portuguese orders is probably the largest in the world, and covers a wide range of styles and subjects.

The author gives a general description of the pieces, provides a note on each illustration, and relates the ivories to the whole corpus of African : William Buller Fagg. In his book Afro-Portuguese Ivories (Batchworth Press, London, n.d.), William Fagg established the identity of an interesting hybrid art-form in a number of ivory Afro-Portuguese ivories book, forks, salt-cellars and horns—carved for European use and to European design, but fashioned according to the canons of the African artist.

While certain that the carvers were Cited by: 7. The carvers of the stone images just described also made ivory items such as spoons, hunting horns, and saltcellars for the Portuguese sailors and traders who were then sailing down the west coast of Africa in their effort to discover a passage to India and the Orient.

They are called Afro-Portuguese ivories. Afro-Portuguese ivories Hardcover – January 1, by William Buller Fagg (Author) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Author: William Buller Fagg.

Kongo ivories are some of the finest sculptural works produced by the people of the west-central Africa's Lower Congo region.

In the Kongo Kingdom, ivory was a precious commodity that was strictly controlled by chiefs and kings, who commissioned sculptors to produce fine ivory sculptures for their personal and courtly use. With the rise of the transatlantic trade, ivory. Afro-Portuguese, African-Portuguese, or Black Portuguese are Portuguese citizens or residents of Portugal with total or partial ancestry from any of the Sub-Saharan ethnic groups of of those perceived as Afro-Portuguese trace their ancestry to former Portuguese overseas colonies in Africa.

Alternatively, Afro-Portuguese may also refer to various populations of Portuguese. The Afro-Portuguese ivories—comprised of ornately carved ivory containers for salt (called salt cellars), hunting horns (called oliphants), forks, spoons, and liturgical vessels—were commissioned from artists working on the coast of what is now the country ofFile Size: KB.

Kathy Curnow () Kathy Curnow's doctoral thesis was an impressive, detailed study of the Afro-Portuguese ivories Like Fagg and Allison she Author: Kathy Curnow. Afro-Portuguese and Loango Coast ivories incorporate visual elements from both foreign and indigenous sources.

Kongo sculptors of Loango ivories saw illustrations from printed serials brought to the area by foreign traders. The figurative carving evident on the Loango ivories appealed to Western tastes for illustrated narratives.

Portuguese ivories, dates from the late fifteenth or early sixteenth century. In Fagg's book Afro-Portuguese Ivories, he remarked in passing that there was no longer any living tradition of ivory carving in Sierra Leone.

One can understand him ignoring the carving of ivory ornaments for tourists, which continues in Sierra Leone up to the.

In William Fagg, then keeper of African collections at the British Museum, identified these ivories fully and for the first time in his book ''Afro-Portuguese Ivories.''. sis and in our book. A bit of chronology is helpful. In (mind the date: Kathy Curnow was four years old) William Fagg's book Afro-Portuguese Ivories first identified a group of ivory carvings that constituted a promising new field of research and coined the new term, "Afro-Portuguese ivories," that subse-quent scholars, including Curnow.

African Ivories. Kate Ezra. Metropolitan Preview this book 20th century Ivory Abiodun African art African ivory Afro Afro-Portuguese horns Afro-Portuguese Late Afro-Portuguese saltcellar Akan American Museum Bassani Ben-Amos Benin 16th century Benin art Benin cat Benin ivory Bequest of Nelson Bracelet Nigeria carved ivory Chaim Gross.

Afro-Portuguese ivories no longer came from Sierra Leone but from the kingdom of Benin (in present-day Nigeria) and were made there by local artists. This is the so-called Benin-Portuguese style.

The ivories in the Kongo-Portuguese style were made by artists of the ancient kingdom of Kongo (in the north of modern Angola). ↑ back Afro-Portuguese Ivories - The first trade goods from West Africa sold in Europe at the beginning of the 16th century, were the Afro-Portuguese Ivories, exquisitely carved spoons forks, saltcellars, pyxes and horns that are found today in museums in Europe and America.

Women, the Art of Power. Three Women from the House of Habsburg translates into English the German catalogue to an exhibition at Schloss Ambras in Innsbruck in The catalogue explores the collections of three Habsburg patrons and is divided into sections devoted to the daughter and granddaughters of Emperor Maximilian I, respectively: Archduchess Margaret.

Such sources help to bridge the gap between the earliest references to Afro-Portuguese ivories in Portuguese customs records (as well as the inventories of royal and princely treasuries of the late Renaissance) and their re-appearance in nineteenth-century museum registers and the collections of private : William Hart.Afro Portuguese Ivories Book London British Museum Collection Decorative Arts Carving Elephant chemindesmuguets.

From shop chemindesmuguets because here they come. There are museum elephant for sale on Etsy, and they cost $ on average. The most common museum elephant material is metal.

The most popular color? You guessed it: blue.In his book Afro-Portuguese Ivories (Batchworth Press, London, n.d.), William Fagg established the identity of an interesting hybrid art-form in a number of ivory objects—spoons, forks, salt.